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. >> the negotiation of some kind is necessary. >> whichever option you favor. this >> let me go northwest to syria. syria was discussed in the presidential campaign but the more it was discussed there and less difference there seemed to be between the two candidate. it came down to should we be arming the opposition? let me ask that question in a broader context? should we are mccumber opposition and whenever answer to that question is what is the strategic approach to the syrian conflict that preserves or protect american interests at this stage? >> let me begin and that end. the american international -- american position on foreign affairs was for in the aftermath of the second world war, the united states had a position of predominance that was unique in human history and transitory as other nations developed that degree of pre-eminence. at the same time the single most powerful country in the world, and the key to stupidity in many regions and the key to progress in many regions and when you say you are no longer preeminent you have to be able to establish priorities and when you establish pr
by the government on purpose. and today, in syria, where they are in year two of a very violent uprising, someone today in syria turned off the whole internet. the whole thing. for the whole country. all of a sudden. like a light switch. look at this graph. shows people using the internet in syria this morning. typing along. tweeting. whatever. and then, boom. lights out. no more internet in syria. somebody hit the off switch. here's another view. the internet in syria humming along, and then all of a sudden, nothing. syria has three cables that connect it to the rest of the world. as of about noon today, local time, this shows the traffic on those cables. all three cables just shut down instantly, off a cliff, nothing moving into syria, nothing flowing out. it's not like this has never happened before. syria has shut down the internet at times of military offensives in this uprising before. and we have seen other governments do this before. the government in egypt shut down the internet last year during the revolution there that toppled mubarak. same thing with government in libya. in the months
the world, i found myself thinking of those, everyone from folks in syria, in homes, trying to show what they could to focus here in oakland with camera phones, trying to show police misbehaving. someone who wrestled with the question of fact of journalism, how to protect people, whether they are citizens or professional. don't really have a big conversation about that. should there be an international standard of journalistic rights were if you are committing journalism you should be protected? out you protect those folks? >> good luck implementing that law. it is a great question, something journalists struggle with all time with a rise of social media and sites you have started out as a compendium of information, shootings in streets, be heading. started off like a visual wallpaper and it has since become more sophisticated and beginning to write articles, the editor is anonymous but they are starting to publish pieces. this thing that was touted early on as being this kind of innovative or new information delivery system is now turning into a more traditional journalistic entity but
very much. let us know what you think. you can follow us on twitter, at ac360. >>> new signs in syria that recent gains scored by rebels may be triggering a brutal response from assad's forces. meantime, word that the united states is weighing new strategies for getting involved in the conflict. a lot of late-breaking developments to cover. we will get a report from arwa damon, one of the few reporters inside syria, right now. >>> in syria there's a sense of growing urgency and anxiety. we will get to why in a moment. first, i would like to show you some images that are quite frankly very disturbing and we want to warn you, extremely graphic. but above all, they are a reminder of why we care so much about this story. why we have been devoting so much time to covering it. we think it's important for the rest of the world to see what's happening to the syrian people. according to the opposition, a government air strike hit a residential area in south-central aleppo, killing 20 people and wounding dozens more. we blurred the most graphic details in the video, which appears to have been s
clout of syria's kurdish minority, and the impact that's having on the other side of the border. >> brown: when does a co-worker count as a supervisor? that question was before the supreme court today in a case about harassment. marcia coyle explains. >> suarez: and we examine new figures from the pew research center showing that young voters played a decisive role reelecting president obama. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: a still tentative american economy looked online today, as digital deals were to be had, and holiday shoppers lit up web sites. retailers h
in tunisia and egypt, then we -- people saying well in places like syria, you have divided communities, divided societies, where in europe -- tunisia you have different groups. in egypt when they had the parliamentary election people assumed that there was prince reply -- support in groups. they did. they controlled most of the policies. well, wip a few months, what do we have? we have even though 46% turned out for that election, remarkably, and the muslim brotherhood has been good in turning out people. their candidates get only 1/4 of the vote. then if you have the final round , the two plrks it was so close we didn't know the results. so egypt is divided somewhat. the brotherhood after the parliamentary election, they have carte plan much, but they discovered they don't. they have been sending in pressure from the right. the writing of these institutions. today, as we speak, in tahrir square there are smowsu thousands of people demonstrating. going for essentially more specific reference to the sharia religious law in the constitution where there is a deal where more moderates are
's behind the egyptian leader's moves. >> brown: then, the death toll in syria's 20-month war has climbed past 40,000, according to a human rights group. we get an update from margaret warner, reporting from the turkish border. >> suarez: we continue our conversations with newly-elected senators. judy woodruff talks with virginia democrat tim kaine. >> i intend to hit the ground on january 3 very much running. > running. we can make progress quickly if we listen to each other and find those points of common ground they think do exist. >> brown: mark shields and david brooks analyze the weeks news. >> suarez: spencer michels has the story of a growing crackdown on dissidents and journalists in iran. >> brown: and we close with poet jennifer fitzgerald on hurricane sandy's destructive path through her home town of staten island. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation.
360. >>> new signs in syria that recent gains scored by rebels may be triggering a brutal response from assad's forces. meantime, word that the united states is weighing new strategies for getting involved in the conflict. a lot of late-breaking developments to cover. we will get a report from arwa damon, one of the few reporters inside syria, right now. oh no, not a migraine now. try this... bayer? this isn't just a headache. trust me, this is new bayer migraine. [ male announcer ] it's the power of aspirin plus more in a triple action formula to relieve your tough migraines. new bayer migraine formula. in a triple action formula to relieve your tough migraines. of washington about the future of medicare and social security. anncr: but you deserve straight talk about the options on the... table and what they mean for you and your family. ancr: aarp is cutting through all the political spin. because for our 37 million members, only one word counts. get the facts at earnedasay.org. let's keep medicare... and social security strong for generations to come. and social security strong
. >>> new signs in syria that recent gains scored by rebels may be triggering a brutal response from assad's forces. meantime, word that the united states is weighing new strategies for getting involved in the conflict. a lot of late-breaking developments to cover. we will get a report from arwa damon, one of the few reporters inside syria, right now. [ male announcer ] this december, remember -- ♪ you can stay in and like something... ♪ [ car alarm deactivates ] ♪ ...or you can get out there with your family and actually like something. ♪ the lexus december to remember sales event is on, offering some of our best values of the year. this is the pursuit of perfection. offering some of our best values of the year. those little things for you, life's about her. but your erectile dysfunction - that could be a question of blood flow. cialis tadalafil for daily use helps you be ready anytime the moment's right. you can be more confident in your ability to be ready. and the same cialis is the only daily ed tablet approved to treat ed and symptoms of bph, like needing to go frequently or
us know what you think. you can follow us on twitter, at ac360. >>> new signs in syria that recent gains scored by rebels may be triggering a brutal response from assad's forces. meantime, word that the united states is weighing new strategies for getting involved in the conflict. a lot of late-breaking developments to cover. we will get a report from arwa damon, one of the few reporters inside syria, right now. try running four.ning a restaurant is hard, fortunately we've got ink. it gives us 5x the rewards on our internet, phone charges and cable, plus at office supply stores. rewards we put right back into our business. this is the only thing we've ever wanted to do and ink helps us do it. make your mark with ink from chase. of washington about the future of medicare and social security. anncr: but you deserve straight talk about the options on the... table and what they mean for you and your family. ancr: aarp is cutting through all the political spin. because for our 37 million members, only one word counts. get the facts at earnedasay.org. let's keep medicare... and social se
and syria. the whole house will be united in concern both at the intolerable situation for the residents of southern israel and the grave loss of life and humanitarian in gaza including the particular impact on children. on the 14th of november, the israeli defense forces began air strikein response to a sharp increase in rocket fire. hamas and other militant groups responded with other rocket fire. as of today, three israeli citizens have been killed and at least 109 palestinians including 33 women and 26 children -- 11 women and 26 children also lled. we have made clear that hamas have the principal responsibility for the start of the current crisis but also that all sides have responsibilities. we quickly called on israel to seek every opportunity to de escalate their militaryesponse and to observe international humanitarian law and avoid civilian casualties. yesterday e.u. foreign ministers condemned the rocket attacks on israel and called for an urgent cessation of hostilities. we have also warned that a ground invasion of gaza could length b the conflict, and erode international su
of what were initially peaceful protests. obviously the situation in syria deteriorated since then. we have been extensively engaged with the international community as well as regional powers to help the opposition. we've committed hundreds of millions of dollars of humanitarian aid to help folks both inside of syria and outside of syria. we are constantly consulting with the opposition on how they can get organized so that they're not splintered and divided in the face of the onabsoluo onslaught of the assad regime. we are in close contact with countries like jordan who immediately border syria and israel who is already having grave concerns as we do, for example, about movement of chemical weapons that might occur in such a chaotic atmosphere. and that could have an impact not just within syria but on the region as a whole. i'm encouraged to see that the syrian opposition created an umbrella group that may have more cohesion than they've had in the past. we're going to be talking to them, my envoys will be traveling to various meetings that will be taking place with the internationa
are high and the deployment of israeli ground forces and syria now threatening the stability of the entire region. >> the situation is incredibly serious. there is a danger that is spreading and control throughout the region, and afraid to say. >> with that in mind, the german foreign minister left the talks prematurely to catch a flight to israel. what's the international monetary fund is urging european governments to take a loss on their holdings of greek government bonds. the imf says the the only way to make grease solvent. >> the move is unpopular in a number of countries, including germany. taking a loss on a greek debt, or a hair cut, is illegal. the director of the imf will be having a talk with eurozone finance ministers. "she came to the philippines to talk about the asian economy, but even in manila, christina guard was unable to escape the eurozone debt crisis -- cristina lagard could not escape the debr crisis. the greek debt is expected to spiral to nearly 180% by the end of this year. by next year, it could be pushing 190%. the head of the imf has suggested that greece may
now in syria, damascus international airport shut down. flights in and out are canceled. fierce fighting closed off the main road to the airport. these clashes happening as the country's internet goes dark and cell phone communication drops out. it's harder to post videos like this one. reportedly showing shelling in aleppo uploaded earlier today. in the past, the syrian government cut off access in an operation. but this is unprecedented. the military jet and two helicopters were shot down by rebels. now, takeovers at military bases given them a new arsenal of heavy weaponry. in this attack, they used rockets and as cnn's arwa damon reports, the rebels claiming this as a major victory. >> reporter: children on the back of a tractor made off with a sizable tangled lump of metal. what was all too often the cause of nightmares now a trophy of war. proudly shown off by this man. we want to take these pieces to show them to the other villages, he says. let them see what happened to these planes. everyone we speak to here describes the fear they felt any time they heard a jet overhea
. >> brown: the battle for control of syria reached ever closer to the capital today. heavy fighting flared near the damascus airport, and online access was cut, as the pressure intensified on president bashar al-assad. we have a report narrated by jonathan rugman of "independent television news." >> reporter: it could be the west's worst nightmare. jubilant jihadist fighters near damascus. this group has captured a helicopter and these islamists are now in the vanguard of syria's rebel army. syrian warplanes and helicopters were filmed attacking the fringes of the capital today. and to the road to the international airport has been closed by fighting. and as that fighting intensifies much of syria's internet network has been cut. the government and opposition are blaming each other for the shutdown. whatever the truth, syria's regime is battling these men for its very survival. president assad's helicopters are being shot down. and even a mig jet was filmed tumbling from the sky. this rebel boasting that he's downed both a helicopter and a mig within 24 hours. these surface to air missiles
're in very close contact with countries like turkey and jordan. that immediately border syria and have an impact and obviously, israel, which is having grave concerns, as we do, for example, about movements of chemical weapons that might occur in such a chaotic atmosphere. it could have an impact on the region as a whole. i'm encouraged to see that the opposition created an umbrella group that may have more cohesion than they have had in the past. my envoys will be traveling and meeting with people. we consider them a legitimate representative of the as operations -- aspirations of the syrian people. it's a broad-based representative group. one of the questions we'll continue to press is making sure that the opposition is committed to a democratic syria, an inclusive syria, a moderate syria. we have seen extremist elements insinuate themselves into the opposition. and one of the things that we have to be on guard about, particularly talking about arming opposition figures, is that we're not indirectly putting arms in the handles of folks who would do americans harm or israelis or othe
is likely to change and where do you think syria is headed at this moment, although we have shifted our focus to this conflict between israel and hamas? dennis? >> what are the options that present themselves? >> look, i think syria is .. headed to a failed state which is nobody's interest in the region, and i think the key at this point is, for us to find a way to do more. you will already seeing the effort to build a more credible opposition. >> rose: right. >> now i think what is needed is also to ensure that the balance of power within that opposition is one that doesn't favor the radical islamists instead it means finding a way to get material support both nonlethal and lethal assistance to those who are more secular, who are submitted to an inclusive future for syria, who are committed to, in fact, a much more democratic future for syria. i think it is almost inevitable that we and others internationally are going to do more to build up the opposition because the alternative is to see a failed state where the kind of conflict you see within syria more and more begins not only to
people across syria are dealing with a nationwide internet blackout and a top official at the united nations has harsh words about the deadly civil war which has stretched on for more than a year. the details are next. and powerful storms are smacking the west coast with heavy rain and winds. ♪ [ male announcer ] are you on medicare? do you have the coverage you need? open enrollment ends friday, december 7th. so don't wait. now's the time to get on a path that could be right for you... with unitedhealthcare medicare solutions. call today to learn about the kinds of coverage we offer, including aarp medicarecomplete plans insured through unitedhealthcare. these medicare advantage plans can combine parts a and b, your hospital and doctor coverage... with part d prescription drug coverage, and extra benefits... all in one complete plan... for a $0 monthly premium. no more than what you already pay for medicare part b. unitedhealthcare doesn't stop there. we'll cover 100% of your preventive services... like an annual physical and immunizations... and you'll have the flexibility to cha
about this? you look what they did and the syria war, in which was they had in 2006, you never heard word one about it before they did it. why are they vocal about this? there's three reasons why they have been so vocal. one, it was designed to motivate the rest of the world, and i think, by the way, if you, you know, we know from our emphasis regarding the idea that the europeans would have adopted the sanctions they did like a boycott on iranian oil if they didn't they the alternative was they would strike voluntarily, and to think that would have happened without the israeli, quote, motivation," is not realistic. the second reason they do it is because they are getting the world ready not to be surprised. if diplomacy fails, and the third reason is to get the public ready. that reflecting their reality, but in answer to the question, we've, you know, you've -- we've not had conversations with others that i'm aware of that would deal with that, but i note for you that david cameron made statements saying, you know, also repeated the words "all options on the table," we want deploam
was down today in syria and some traffic was halted at the airport in damascus as rebels battled government forces. good evening, i'm jeffrey brown. >> suarez: and i'm ray suarez. on the "newshour" tonight, margaret warner examines what the latest clashes tell us about the strength of the assad regime and of the opposition. >> brown: then, we update the growing unrest in egypt where the islamist-dominated assembly fast-tracked a vote on a new constitution. >> suarez: we continue our conversations with newly-elected senators. tonight, arizona republican, jeff flake. >> >> we're at a point on the fiscal issues where we have to reach an agreement and perhaps as we do so that will start the stage for the other areas as well. >> brown: fred de sam lazaro has the story of a minnesota non- profit that celebrates diversity and the power of dance. >> they're one of the few companies that within their own work spans so many kinds of different style, from classical ballet to modern danceo contemporary performance to urban dance. >> suarez: and we look at college sports teams, moving from conference to
, on libya, syria, and other things. she doesn't pull any punches, but she was the first to speak in reply to this historic vote from the u.s. chair inside the general assembly and she said, look, pushing a green button inside the general assembly hall is not going to achieve middle east peace, this resolution really does not create a reality of a state. there is no state for the palestinians on the ground. it's counterproductive, there will be more obstacles. i'm sure shue knew that many people would be watching not just in the middle east but also on capitol hill where she will face potentially a nomination battle which is already under way. >> all right, richard roth, live for us at the u.n. in new york. thank you for that. >>> and, by the way, the israeli government spokesperson called the u.n. vote on the palestinian authority, quote, political theater. but the palestinian authority chief negotiator says the new status eliminates israeli justifications for building settlements in the disputed areas of east jerusalem and the west bank. ♪ announcing the all-new 2013 malibu from chevro
to universities. they focus on the violence and syria and the challenges each jet phases going forward. this is about an hour. >> good morning. i am bill clifford, president and ceo of world boston. as we head into the ultimate panel, assessing the aftermath of the arabs bring, please allow me to think todd culpeper, president and ceo of the world affairs council of america, his crack staff, national council chair, lori murray, and our many sponsors for this significantly stimulating conference thus far. [applause] like america, i am awash in debt it is time to make good on those obligations to each year on the panel, who i'm honored to present. i have had the pleasure of hearing at dozens of universities in the boston area. i am telling you a way overdue invitation to our counsel downtown. the professor is a senior fellow at the sovran center at brookings institution, a distinguished former adviser to my current adviser to many government agencies, u.s. leaders, and diplomats, and a prolific and best-selling author let me quote from the top of his website at the university of maryland
of aggression from iran we will speak with a former intelligence officer coming up next. and syria's president bashar al-assad's defiant message about his future. [ male announcer ] yep, there's 8 layers of ole grain fiber in those mini-wheats® biscuits... to help keep you full... ♪ 45 buels of wheat on the farm. 45 bushels of wheat! ♪ ...all mning long. there's a big breakft... [ mini ] yeehaw! ...in those fun little biscuits. [ male announcer ] the rhythm of life. [ whistle blowing ] where do you hear that beat? campbell's healthy request soup lets you hear it... in your heart. [ basketball bouncing ] heart healthy. great taste. mmm... [ male announcer ] sounds good. it's amazing what soup can do. >>shepard: now the new pentagon report that iran fired on an unarmed u.s. drone in international airspace. the c.e.o. of the washington, dc, consulting firm. what do you make of this? >>guest: two points. one, does this mean they can track our aircraft better? one went down over iran last year and they gathered intelligence. there have been newspaper stories about china and others collecting i
for most of the past decade were syria and iran. the leadership was damascus. that got totally destroyed because hamas is part of the broader muslim brotherhood network in the middle east as morsi is one of the leaders of the egyptian muslim brotherhood so hamas the palestinian brotherhood and the muslim brotherhood in syria is the single biggest group in the political if not military opposition to assets so the relationship between hamas and syria is destroyed. the relationship between hamas and iran barely exists. iran does have ties to other smaller militant groups in gaza. >> jennifer: hussein are you saying -- >> does maintain some relations with hamas but they're not close. you're absolutely right though to point out that what all of this is doing to the p.a., the palestinian authority and the plo, western friendly and interested in peace agreement with israel, not interested in a fight to the death or armed struggle. they essentially have gotten into a very huge pickle over the past year because a year ago
. but these are some of the lucky ones. having escaped the fighting in syria, they face a different challenge. in jordan, the winter can bring miracle dangers with heavy rain and subzero temperatures. thousands of children do not have the necessary shelter or clothing to ensure survival. >> they love their country. they are displaced refugees. they did not -- they came in summertime. they have nothing for winter. they need to be prepared for winter. >> save the children warrants to hundred thousand old rubles children could be among those that struggle the most. many have fled over the syrian border in a variety of direction. there are 2 million others displaced in the country. more are expected to escape. this was the border in northern syria today. it is those that do not reach the care of international agencies for whom the danger is greatest. save the children says some refugees have not been able to watch for more than a fortnight because the only water is ice cold. that brings concerns about sanitation and disease. inside syria, fighting continues to rage. the 400,000 serious -- syrians
approach. and then there's the issue of syria. please say some words about what you see as the next steps with regard to iran, how do we see that unfolding in the time ahead, and then what's the way forward with syria? >> yeah. three things. one, you know, the arab spring turned out to be less spring. probably the better term is the arab awakening, and we're going to go through springs and winters and summers and falls, and it's going to vary country to country, and it's going to take a long time. but look, it was inevitable, unavoidable and actually a good thing that the people of the arab world should start taking some responsibility for their future. and there's just no going back. and it is very much in our interest how these awakenings come out and that they result in societies that are democratic, that are producing a better life for their people, and we should do everything we can in a smart way recognizing we're not so popular in the middle east right now to try to help get that outcome. there are a couple big threats to that. one is syria, and i'm more worried about syria in term
for political solutions? the current policy that we have in syria, where we seem to be attempting to limit the regional influence on the air world, are we doing the right thing when i'm not -- are we doing too much. i cannot end without mentioning the palestinian question. more often i hear the argument that the argument is dead and that is a shame. because if we are going to negotiate with iran, it might be intelligent to do more than just talk about the nuclear issue. it might be better to talk about the full range of issues that are between us. at one point in time, iran indicated that willingness to talk about this and interest in doing their best. i think it makes in that region on all of these of concern concerns. we have a number of studies that are looking at the costs and benefits. the costs are very significant. i would like to mention one study that i think is something that hasn't been done in other studies. that is a study by trita parsi that details the human casualties in war from the toxic chemical fumes and the radioactivity. on both sides of the gulf. that is something yo
. they are interesting. see the list of countries that it was really at it in. iran, syria, lebanon, saudi arabia, egypt. sometimes it is called viper. a little bit confusing because they often times see things get kind of melted into each other. like you know, a very interesting whole incident. the size and sophistication of this was so great that i think the conclusion is clear that it was a government that was doing this. it is just unfathomable that it could then a smaller kind of scale operation. i think one of my colleagues is going to talk about estonia a little bit more, too. in 2007, estonia removed a statue, a soviet era statute and it caused turmoil between estonia and russia and lo and behold if it didn't become a lot of cyberattacks on mr. linea shutting down their telephone networks commissioning down their banking systems, websites and so on. government services and so on. it was never proven of his russia doing it, but the conclusion is that the very least of his russian hackers. in the end, nato, who is very active in helping estonia understand this, nato step dad and ultimately there's
displayed in the face of what were initially peaceful protests. obviously, the situation in syria's deteriorated since then. we have been extensively engaged with the international community, as well as regional powers, to help the opposition. we have committed to hundreds of millions of dollars of humanitarian aid to help folks both inside of syria and outside of syria. we are constantly consulting with the opposition on how they can get organized so that they're not splintered and divided in the face of the onslaught from the assad regime. we are in very close contact with countries like turkey and jordan that immediately border syria and have an impact. obviously, israel which is having already a grave concerns as we do about, for example, movements of chemical weapons that might occur in such a chaotic atmosphere and that could have an impact not just within syria but on the region as a whole. i'm encouraging to see that the syrian opposition created an umbrella group that may have more cohesion than they have had in the past. we're going to be talking to them. my enjoys will
if this becomes a multifront operation. >> can i just get one little quick tour, syria. >> yes. >> if i understand, that's mostly hezbollah operating in syria. is hamas in syria? >> well, this is a great question because in the case of syria, this has caused a rift between hamas and iran and hezbollah. you have the iranian government backing assad, you have hezbollah backing assad, and you have hamas basically lined up with the opposition. so in many respects, syria has drived a wedge between iran and its former client. >> all right. now, let me go back to israel. iran basically owns hamas, is that fair? >> well, iran has provided financial support. >> they're the financier. i mean, hezbollah, too, but let's stay with hamas for the moment. iran is the banker. >> iran has been a banker. other countries have been as well. they've gotten money from countries like saudi arabia as well. in the case of hezbollah, that is the very, very close partnership. i mean, hezbollah really grew out of the iranian revolution. it is the export of the iranian revolution. so that is the very symbiotic relationship. ha
peaceful protests. obviously the situation in syria has deteriorated since then. we have been engaged to help the opposition. we have committed to hundreds of millions of dollars of humanitarian aid to help folks both inside of syria and outside of syria. we are constantly consulting with the opposition on how they can get organized so that they're not splinters and divided in the face of the onslaught from the assaad regime. we are in very close contact with countries like turkey and jordan that immediately border syria and have an impact and obviously israel which is having already grave concerns as we do about, for example, movements of chemical weapons that might occur in such a chaotic atmosphere. and they could have an impact not just within syria but on the reas a whole. i'm encouraged to see that the syrian opposition created an umbrella group that may have more cohesion than they had in the past. we're going to be talking to them, my envoys are going to be traveling to various meetings taking place with the international community and the opposition. we consider them a legiti
or syria you will see that in each of these cases there are significant cases funding and model was hard to do. people like to fight the eastern european case because it was successful. the problem there is there wasn't a nato membership in the e.u. but helped to really drive that political role and meet the commitment of the government to undertake the reform. certainly for a country like tunisia. what they're looking at interestingly enough are the cases of south korea, taiwan and south africa as examples of places that have undergone a similar authoritarian transitions to the space rule, particular emphasis on the police and internal capability. >> i'm very glad you mentioned those last few cases that may in fact pulled out some opportunities from learning because if we hadn't integrated that possibility into the way this group responded to the question i would have underscored just how potentially significance the absence of prior model is for the securities sector reform in the arab world because it causes a great deal about the limited validity of what we often think about as best
. there's egypt, gaza, syria, iran. there's a president's second term that's got to be dominated by this region. >> i think so. it's the middle east, so there's good news and bad news. the good news is that the obama administration did an excellent job of supporting israel all through this. made israel feel moderate and the arabs feel realistic. the second piece of good news is that egypt, even under the muslim brotherhood, has an interest in having stability. that's very important. the bad news is the islamists are in control. in the palestinian areas with hamas and certainly in control in egypt. and there's going to be no peace as long as they are there in control, and u.s. policy has got to be a long, gradual process of trying to build up the non-islamists in the arab world, including in iran, across the region. >> that frames it. we'll hear more from you in the roundtable. >>> now let me turn to carl levin, chairman of course of the armed services committee in the senate. senator, to egypt. how concerned are you? is morsi a partner of the united states, or a problem? >> yes.
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 289 (some duplicates have been removed)